Thursday, July 05, 2018

Austin Appalling

Given that Austin Macauley is a vanity press that charges thousands of dollars, has a terrible contract, and throws threatening letters from lawyers around like confetti, I have one question....

...What does that say about so-called indie publisher groups that they are officially "associated with"?
  • Independent Book Publishers Association (IBPA) -- "IBPA's MISSION is to lead and serve the independent publishing community through advocacy, education, and tools for success."
  • Independent Publishers Guild (IPG) -- "The IPG helps publishers to do better business and become part of a real community"
  • The Publishers Association -- "Our objective as an association is to provide our members with the influence, insight and services necessary to compete and prosper."

Thursday, September 07, 2017

Unofficial Kinde Help FAQ #1: Why are my sales not showing in my reports

Zhao!
I have been asked this one enough times that I thought it might be time to write a standard reply.

Authors often feel they have had Amazon sales that are not appearing on their sales reports, and  perhaps a suspicion they are being deliberately short-changed in some way.  In my experience this is not the case. Here are some of the things that might explain the apparent discrepancy.

1) Make sure you are looking at the right place in the reports, after the sales has been shipped and charged.
2) If it is an e-book you cannot buy more than one copy.
3) If it is a CreateSpace paperback, those sales are reported on your Createspace  account reports, not your kindle account reports.
3) If it is a gifted book the sale occurs only when the the recipient uses it, and they have the option to use it on something other than your book--in which case you are out the money and do not get the sale.
3) Friends and relatives lie more often than you would think. If they say they bought your book don't assume it is true unless you actually saw them do it.
4) Occasionally there are glitches and reports of sales are delayed.  If you can document the sale occurred and have waited about 2 weeks, ask Kindle Support for assistance.

If you know if other reason why people see these issues, please let me know and I will add them to the list.


Tuesday, August 01, 2017

Update

Things have been a little quiet around here.  I have been busy at work and also developing a lifestyle where I just hang out and enjoy myself quite a lot.  That's turned out to be the upside of being a woman of a certain age.  I have a sufficiency of money and have more-or-less stopped giving a flock about a lot of things, so I spend more time just enjoying myself. That said, I do plan to  spruce things up and post some new reviews soon.

If you happen to have any interest in reviewing, we are always open to people joining in on a one-off or ongoing basis.  Just drop me a line at veinglory at gmail.com

There is one thing I would like to mention regarding authors who request reviews.  Please don't spam us.  I am getting increasingly bogged down in mass mailings and newsletters from authors.  A recent one ended with the statment:

"You are receiving this email either because you are a personal acquaintance or you because you have read and/or reviewed one of my novels. My intent is not to overwhelm you with emails but to keep in touch with updates. Thanks so much."

Just: no.

Reading or reviewing a book does not constitute agreeing to be put on a mailing list.  Going forwards any more emails of this type will be reported as spam. This means, among other things, that any future requests for reviews will be blocked.

Edited to Add:

Re: Instafreebie--this is a service that requires provision of an email address and adds the user to a mailing list.  As such, Instafreebie is not an acceptable method for offering review copies.


Monday, March 28, 2016

Court Rules: Amazon is not a Publisher

An unfortunate couple found that their engagement photo had appeared, without permission, on the cover of a book suggestively entitled “A Gronking To Remember”. Recently a court ruled that they could not, as a result, sue Amazon, Barnes and Noble, or Smashwords. The reason being that these websites are not publishers... they are shops. Which is a reminder that when we self-publish in these venues we alone take on all the liabilities of a publisher, and should be correspondingly careful abut the choices that we make.

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

REVIEW: Ten Gentle Opportunities

Title: Ten Gentle Opportunities
Author: Jeff Duntemann
Genre: Fantasy / Science fiction
Price: $2.99 (ebook)
Publisher: Copperwood Press
ISBN: B01AQ1549E
Point of Sale: Amazon  
Reviewed by: Chris Gerrib

So I’ve been a fan of Jeff Duntemann’s writing for some time.  This, his newest novel and first since 2006, was well-worth the wait.  The novel opens with one Bartholomew Stypek on the run from a magician in a fairly low-tech fantasy setting.  The chief difference between this world and the bog-standard Fantasyland is that magic can be bought and sold like salt, and worked at least in part by non-adepts.  Stypek’s on the run because he stole ten “Opportunities” (raw magic) from a magician, who wants them back.

Desperate to save his hide, Stypek throws himself at the mercy of the Continuum, and asks to be sent far away.  This is where things get interesting, because Stypek ends up in our immediate future (late 2020s’) in a small town advertising agency.  The ad agency has a prototype AI-built copier, and in our world magic maps to software.  Stypek has (or rather concocts) a Gomog as a traveling companion.  In our world, said Gomog is an AI, and gets loose in the Tooniverse, a virtual space where various AIs live.  Unfortunately for Stypek, the magician who’s after him can and will follow him to our world.  Mayhem, entertaining mayhem, ensues. 

A lot of the attraction of this book is the clever writing.  Several AIs of various levels are point-of-view characters, as are a number of humans.  Stypek keeps trying to map our world to his kings-and-magic one, and the humans and AIs keep trying to map Stypek’s magic to bits and bytes.  The conflict and confusion between these world-views is amusing and realistic. 

The interpersonal conflict and characterization is also well-done.  Two of the human characters are a divorced couple, forced by economics to work together, and then get sucked into Stypek’s life-or-death struggle.  One of the AIs learns to dance, which proves to be a critical skill.

There were two nits that bothered me in this story.  First, one of the AIs, Simple Simon, is in charge of running a robotic factory in which the parts and the finished products (copiers) are thrown in the air instead of moved via conveyor belts.  It felt a bit too convenient for the author.  The other nit was the AI dancing – I saw that coming a mile away.


Having said that, I was easily able to suspend my disbelief and take a rollicking ride with Jeff Duntemann and his Gentle Opportunities.  Highly recommended.